1. when it’s been like 10 years

    and you can still remember the track order from your mom’s #$%@$#$ winter sonata soundtrack CD, but not where you put your house keys yesterday

     
  2. fergiedellorusso:

    as a korean-american young adult, ive had to deal with the fact that so many young americans romanticize japanese culture (for example that one popular post i saw going around a while ago written by some weaboo about how japanese culture is so perfect and nice and polite because some person returned a safety pin or some shit) and it makes me so angry how the stories of millions of east asian people suffering through genocide, cultural cleansing, colonization, etc are often ignored and looked over in favor of what the idealized weaboo idea of what japanese culture is. i’m a firm believer that every culture and society has wonderful, beautiful, unique aspects to it and japan is certainly no exception but seeing a bunch of people support notable japanese people who are literally WAR CRIME AND GENOCIDE APOLOGISTS and choose to just ignore and refuse to educate themselves about how the japanese government is literally trying to cover up MASS MURDER and other obscene war atrocities while claiming to be ~~~soo obsessed~~ with everything about Japan it’s like…. ok i get you wanna be a fan of some anime and that’s cool but please educate yourselves and maybe try not to support horrible people who think my country is “better off” after having been colonized and having my people murdered, raped, and stripped of their identities. i understand most people are clueless about this and that’s okay but ignoring that some asshole is a war crime apologist just because you like some anime just adds to the collective ignorance about historical AND modern (japanese textbooks and other media are still covering this shit up TO THIS DAY) issues that really should be brought to light. i know i always get really preach-y about this but being a war crime apologist is still fairly accepted in modern japan to some people and it makes me want to fucking cry and scream and seeing instances of modern weaboo ass bitches overlooking and not caring about any of it just adds insult to injury

    Uh, fellow Korean-Am here: Zainichi, actually, so I can verify my existence is literally a result of the devastation of Japanese imperialism on the people and nation of Korea— very directly, in a series of not-that-distant ugly events that I’d rather not detail.

    Can we clarify we’re talking about Isayama Hajime and the dumbass ignorant pro-imperialist bullshit he’s said on Twitter?  (If we are, that is; I’m just assuming so, though if another currently popular Japanese media figure is doing the same thing I’m going to put my head in my hands for a while.)  I understand you’re probably not saying so out of fear of inciting drama and fandom defensiveness— and shit, I understand that— but the alternative seems to be a vague post encouraging suspicion of Japan and discouraging weeaboo cultural fetishization not because it’s like, an obnoxious and offensive thing for any Americans to do, but because Japan itself is undeserving.

    Isayama doesn’t represent Japan; Himaruya Hidekazu (of Hetalia) doesn’t represent Japan, though they’re both products of the same empire-related cultural poison and historical erasure.  Criticizing Westerners for being into Hetalia because it’s fucking mindbogglingly offensive and horrifyingly clueless is one thing— as an example.  Encouraging anti-Japanese sentiments in Westerners is kind of another.  In my experience, if there’s one thing white Americans find comforting in talking about Japan, it’s talking about how racist the Japanese are.  I wonder why that is.

    Isayama Hajime is one 26-year-old mangaka with inexcusable opinions he had the lack of common sense to put on Twitter.  He’s not the nation of Japan.  I don’t think encouraging white Americans to self-righteously feel better about Japanese war crimes helps shit-all; it’s like Iris Chang’s The Rape of Nanking all over again, top of the bestsellers in the US not because people cared suddenly about the incredible crime against humanity that was the Nanjing massacre, but because it makes Americans feel better when they can talk about other imperialism as if it compares to theirs.

    So yeah, although you didn’t call him out— and if you weren’t talking about him, sorry, I’m going to look like an ass — I’m gonna name him here.  Let’s talk about a sector of SNK fandom’s uncritical hero-worship, sure, and how it ties into Japanophilia, but please god let’s not incite white Americans against anything but white America.

    Again, I say this as another Korean-American, and believe me I am pretty sure I do not enjoy the American amnesia of Japanese colonialism any more than you do.  But let’s clarify that this isn’t about the nation of Japan, this is about the nation of America and its willingness to overlook shit that happened to people it doesn’t quite see as people in the service of enjoying fun media: in this case, Korean people.

     
  3. Han is a concept in Korean culture attributed as a national cultural trait. Han denotes a collective feeling of oppression and isolation in the face of overwhelming odds. It connotes aspects of lament and unavenged injustice.

    The minjung theologian Suh Nam-dong describes han as…

    Ah yeah, han.  It’s interesting, I see han come up a lot on the internet in discussions of Korean culture, but in my own upbringing jeong was actually reinforced much more explicitly.  Han and jeong are often brought up as two of the most unique aspects of Korean culture, but as one of these links points out, it’s not so much that they’re unique to Korea as they’re important enough concepts that they have specific words with specific connotations to describe them.  Jeong is a form of collectivism and connection: it doesn’t have the connotations of transcending-the-hungry-self altruism that Christian caritas does, which is universal, but rather bonds you can’t and perhaps shouldn’t deny regardless of how you feel about it otherwise.  It’s hard to describe.

    The way my relatives always brought it up, it was usually in the context of a mix between compassion and loyalty and sometimes consideration: my mom would deem that some unkind people had a sense of jeong whereas my (white American biological) father who has a genuine sense of justice and kindness to strangers has rather a cold lack of jeong when it comes to the unwilling and inescapable bonds with family and community.  In a sense compassion and love are choices in this context but jeong isn’t.  Like compassion is cold (if brilliant) and jeong is warm (if binding), to use confusing sensory terms.

    Han on the other hand has almost never come up, but at the same time, it’s always come up in our discussions of Korean and family history, it backgrounds everything.  It was just not reinforced as a value—it was just always there, kind of a bitter inheritance.  Other Koreans and Korean-Americans may have had different experiences, mind, this is all personal anecdote and no sociology.

    (I don’t entirely subscribe to either of these things, but there’s no denying they’re part of my upbringing and the way the world was initially framed to me.)

    People may be a little more familiar with the Japanese concept of nakama, which is not reeeally the same thing and is in a different context but the emphasis on which is grounded in kind of similar cultural priorities.  Couldn’t say much more than that, though, despite Japanese heredity and to some extent ethnicity—Zainichi status is complicated.

     
  4. Confusion

    shitmystudentswrite:

    Korea: More confusion than China.  

     
  5. 05:14

    Notes: 589425

    Reblogged from quantumscoot

    Tags: koreanasian invasion

    quantumscoot:

    thekawaiiangel:

    awkwardsituationist:

    “world of averages” - composite images culled from thousands of individual portraits resulting in symmetrical average faces

    this was too cool not to reblog

    I can see why people can’t pin down where in Asia I’m from

    I’m pleased by my vague resemblance to Average Korean Actor.

     
  6. kotaline:

    ourlightsinvain:

    kotaline:

    ourlightsinvain replied to your post: sometimes when i encounter people on the internet…

    i remember my second-grade classmates making fun of the hanbok on my korean “culture doll” i made as a school project where we had to make dolls representing our backgrounds. i glanced enviously at the british ones.

    that’s the fucking thing, isn’t it, because you remember that shit, and all the asian jokes your fucking friends and classmates make pile up and then, THEN you have the anglophile phase because being asian is opening yourself up to mockery simply by being asian, and when you get over it and look back, you realize one of the reasons why you had it and you just feel kind of queasy and sick. but if you tell anybody, even people you know and like, there’s a 90 percent chance you’re gonna get told that you’re being overdramatic or overreacting, or making shit up that wasn’t there, making shit up about your own feelings and experiences.

    Oh, life is a glorious cycle of song, a medley of microaggressions. :\  I’m really sorry you had to go through that.  I’m really sorry any of us had to go through that.  And then you hit the point in your teens when all of a sudden all the cool kids are eating the Pocky they made fun of you for bringing to school as a child and you have a hard time explaining why you snort cynically at many of your white friends’ participation in Well-Meaning Fandom Diversity and… yeah.  I’ve got nothing deep or insightful to add here, just: that sucks.  I see you and I hear you.  I know it’s true.

    Yeah, some other people have commented with their own experiences. I’m just going to post them without commentary. Explaining these things to Well-Meaning Friends is especially exhausting, because they are trying, and you know they’re trying, but sometimes you just want to tell them to shut the fuck up because you’ve had enough about hearing how your taking them to a pho restaurant or whatever “expands their horizons” or how they’ve microanaylzed the diversity in Thing You Both Like because they just don’t get it, not really, and you have no way of explaining it to them without sounding like an ass.

    lol yeah.  Their clueless John Cho gifsets and meta.  The innocent way they marvel the first time they see dolsot bibimbap and report back to their friends like a wide-eyed young anthropologist on their first field mission.  It’s not even malicious, it’s just… wearisome.  And impossible to explain.

     
  7. kotaline:

    ourlightsinvain replied to your post: sometimes when i encounter people on the internet…

    i remember my second-grade classmates making fun of the hanbok on my korean “culture doll” i made as a school project where we had to make dolls representing our backgrounds. i glanced enviously at the british ones.

    that’s the fucking thing, isn’t it, because you remember that shit, and all the asian jokes your fucking friends and classmates make pile up and then, THEN you have the anglophile phase because being asian is opening yourself up to mockery simply by being asian, and when you get over it and look back, you realize one of the reasons why you had it and you just feel kind of queasy and sick. but if you tell anybody, even people you know and like, there’s a 90 percent chance you’re gonna get told that you’re being overdramatic or overreacting, or making shit up that wasn’t there, making shit up about your own feelings and experiences.

    Oh, life is a glorious cycle of song, a medley of microaggressions. :\  I’m really sorry you had to go through that.  I’m really sorry any of us had to go through that.  And then you hit the point in your teens when all of a sudden all the cool kids are eating the Pocky they made fun of you for bringing to school as a child and you have a hard time explaining why you snort cynically at many of your white friends’ participation in Well-Meaning Fandom Diversity and… yeah.  I’ve got nothing deep or insightful to add here, just: that sucks.  I see you and I hear you.  I know it’s true.

     
  8. Grumbling

    zenaldehyde:

    troisroyaumes:

    Randomly stumbled across a post that made the claim that a lot of East Asian languages stemmed from the same language and shared cognates, just like European Romance languages! This post was specifically a critical response to the Cho Chang video that made the mistake of assuming “Cho” and “Chang” are only family names in Korean. Funny how both things trigger my “someone is Wrong on the Internet!” response.

    Read More

    I like this rant!

    Tangential personal note: my surname is neither the Korean 조 (duh, ‘cos I’m not Korean) nor the Chinese 趙, but 曹, pronounced Chao in Mandarin. (曹操的曹, as we used to say in Chinese school!)

    I assume it’s been transliterated as Cho because that is how you pronounce it in Hakka — but I do not know because I do not speak or understand Hakka, despite being Hakka on both sides of the family. (Peranakan Hokkien 4eva!)

     
  9. handsomeasians:

source
I cannot better Wikipedia’s description of Handsome Asian Ko Un.
Ko Un is a South Korean poet. His works have been translated and published in more than 15 countries and he has been imprisoned many times.

    handsomeasians:

    source

    I cannot better Wikipedia’s description of Handsome Asian Ko Un.

    Ko Un is a South Korean poet. His works have been translated and published in more than 15 countries and he has been imprisoned many times.

     
  10. #koreankidproblems

    "Young [Surname] has added you to [some LinkedIn thing you don’t check]"

    • *frysquint* not sure if mom, uncle, other uncle, or aunt
    • the fact that your relatives add you on LinkedIn, not Facebook