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  2. 17:52 22nd Aug 2014

    Notes: 6433

    Reblogged from edictalis

    Tags: daniel dangerillustration

    image: Download

    tinymediaempire:

"we can no longer protect you forever."by Daniel Danger24x36” five color screenprint. 2014Thursday 8/21/14: im posting this new print on tumblr, twitter, and instagram. reblog, retweet, or instagram this image with the title and #danieldanger and i, through some very scientific means, will pick one random follower who does this from each service on monday and send them a personalized copy for free. sound good? cool. shameless? yes.

    tinymediaempire:

    "we can no longer protect you forever."
    by Daniel Danger
    24x36” five color screenprint.
    2014

    Thursday 8/21/14: im posting this new print on tumblr, twitter, and instagram. reblog, retweet, or instagram this image with the title and #danieldanger and i, through some very scientific means, will pick one random follower who does this from each service on monday and send them a personalized copy for free. sound good? cool. shameless? yes.

     
  3. victongai:

    'Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage' by Haruki Murakami

    Victo Ngai

    Being a long time Murakami fans, I was super excited when AD Kim from Boston Globe asked me to create the art for the “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage” book review. 

    In “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage,” Haruki Murakami’s latest novel, he allows his hero to eavesdrop on one of life’s darkest possible tunes: the inner hum, the secret desire, for death. As the book opens, the “colorless” Tsukuru Tasaki has fallen into a terrible depression. Tsukuru’s four closest friends, who are nicknamed by colors, abruptly and unequivocally cut him off. All he can think about is dying. Tsukuru escapes the void, just barely, and emerges a new person, the person we follow through the rest of this book. Murakami elegantly describes how emotional trauma can lead us to disassociate. Read the book review here.

    Big thanks to AD Kim Vu. This is actually my first time working with the Boston Globe, what a great way to start!

     
  4. evandahm:

    I couldn’t find a place in NYC that does large-format scanning for any reasonable amount of money, so I scanned the Orrery drawing myself in like 15 parts. It took a long time.

    Here are some more process images: cleaning up linework, blocking everything out in flat colors, and marking some layers of distance to work with later. More nitty-gritty coloring details soon.

     
  5. wherearchitectureisfun:

    WAÏF: Postcards from Luna Park

    Source

     
  6.  
  7. 18:23 25th Jul 2014

    Notes: 13593

    Reblogged from milk-paws

    Tags: tegan and saraartillustration

    image: Download

    milk-paws:

Collage, 2010

    milk-paws:

    Collage, 2010

     
  8. 21:17 18th Jul 2014

    Notes: 605

    Reblogged from books0977

    Tags: j. walter westillustration

    image: Download

    books0977:

Woman reading International Studio. The Studio Almanac, A Magazine of Fine and Applied Art. New York, 1897. J. Walter West (English, 1860-1933).
West exhibited 17 works at the Royal Academy and four at the Royal Society of British Artists. He was Vice President of the Royal Society of Painters in Watercolours.

    books0977:

    Woman reading International Studio. The Studio Almanac, A Magazine of Fine and Applied Art. New York, 1897. J. Walter West (English, 1860-1933).

    West exhibited 17 works at the Royal Academy and four at the Royal Society of British Artists. He was Vice President of the Royal Society of Painters in Watercolours.

     
  9. image: Download

    oldbookillustrations:

How Galahad drew out the sword from the floating stone at Camelot.
Arthur Rackham, from The romance of King Arthur, abridged from Malory’s Morte d’Arthur by Alfred W. Pollard, New York, 1920.
(Source: archive.org)

    oldbookillustrations:

    How Galahad drew out the sword from the floating stone at Camelot.

    Arthur Rackham, from The romance of King Arthur, abridged from Malory’s Morte d’Arthur by Alfred W. Pollard, New York, 1920.

    (Source: archive.org)

     
  10. image: Download

    (Source: ulimeyer)